Harley vs indian




Harley vs indian

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  • Harley, Indian or Triumph: Which Bobber is Best?
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  • And over the past year, three of the motorcycles I’ve loved riding most have been the various interpretations on the bobber theme that have been presented by Harley-Davidson, Indian, and Triumph: the Street Bob, Scout Bobber, and Bonneville Bobber. Each of the three brands.

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    Harley vs indian

    Harley vs indian

    For me, being connected to the machine is a special piece of enjoying a motorcycle ride. More recently, Triumph has introduced the Bonneville Bobber Black — a blacked-out version of the Bonneville Bobber that comes with dual front discs and adds cruise control to the list of standard items. That said, things improved a hell of a lot when I rode a Scout Bobber equipped with accessory mini ape-hanger bars. Unique to the trio in its use of a liquid-cooled parallel twin engine, the Bonneville Bobber offers a somewhat sportier take on the bobber concept — thanks in part to a lean angle more generous than that found on the other two.

    Harley vs indian

    Harley vs indian

    Harley vs indian

    Harley vs indian

    Harley vs indian

    Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special vs. Indian Chieftain Dark Horse | Cycle World

    I have a pretty awesome job. It seems the current definition of a bobber is an aesthetically stripped-down cruiser with mid-set pegs and a solo seat. Another important aspect of a bobber, it seems, and one that is no less difficult to define is the concept of heritage.

    Bobbers are bikes that aesthetically harken back to a different time—ostensibly the post-WWII era when returning servicemen stripped their bikes of all unnecessary weight for the sake of going faster. Each of the three brands trades heavily on a heritage that stretches back more than a century; Indian traces its roots to , Triumph to , and Harley-Davidson to Harley is the only member of the group that can claim to have actually been manufacturing motorcycles the whole time, but all three can legitimately claim to have been part of the original bobber movement.

    Harley vs indian

    Equipped with an all-new engine, chassis, and suspension, the new Street Bob is markedly better than previous iterations. As I wrote in my review: As a Harley it is, by default, the standard by which all other bobbers are measured.

    High-quality fit and finish, a fun engine, and fantastic looks mean that standard is not an easy one to meet. This number comes from a recent Cycle World test of the Fat Bob, which is powered by the same engine. Unveiled in summer , the Scout Bobber makes use of the same chassis and liquid-cooled engine as the standard Scout, which was first introduced back in Different tires and riding position, however, manage to deliver a unique riding experience — one that feels better suited to making the most of the heralded powerplant.

    Harley vs indian

    Unique to the trio in its use of a liquid-cooled parallel twin engine, the Bonneville Bobber offers a somewhat sportier take on the bobber concept — thanks in part to a lean angle more generous than that found on the other two. Aesthetically, the bike is a… ahem… triumph, demonstrating a level of fit and finish that would have been unimaginable from the British manufacturer even five years ago.

    Similar to the Indian, it is littered with tiny branded touches that show dedication and care. More recently, Triumph has introduced the Bonneville Bobber Black — a blacked-out version of the Bonneville Bobber that comes with dual front discs and adds cruise control to the list of standard items. The Triumph Bonneville Bobber easily takes the prize when it comes technology and comfort. Meanwhile, the seating position on the Triumph is adjustable, which means you automatically have a better shot at being comfortable.

    Even in its more aggressive stance I prefer the Triumph for my 6-foot-1 frame. That said, things improved a hell of a lot when I rode a Scout Bobber equipped with accessory mini ape-hanger bars. The biggest strike against the Triumph is the fact it relies on chain final drive.

    Harley vs indian

    The other two are belt-driven, which makes life a lot easier. In terms of engine, the Indian wins without question or second thought. The ability to tear away in a generally un-cruiser-like manner will put the spirit of hooliganism in you. Not as much as on the Harley, but enough to make you feel small. The feeling is alleviated somewhat by the addition of mini ape-hanger handlebars, which allow you to sit more upright and give you a greater sense of commanding the bike.

    Lastly, where the Harley really manages to beat the other two is in presence and, possibly, gravitas. With its enormous Milwaukee Eight V-twin rumbling between your knees the Street Bob feels the most substantial. Aesthetically, whereas the Indian and Triumph are steeped in ornate touches, the Harley sticks a little more to the bare-bones spirit of a bobber.



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