New tires go on front or back




New tires go on front or back

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  • Shouldn't the new tires go on the front? - The Globe and Mail
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  • You've bought a new pair of tyres, but here's a question, should you fit the front tyres are working much harder than those on the rear axle.

    Not only will some retailers refuse to put new tires on the front when buying only on the front, the rear tires lost grip first, the rear end of the car started to come.

    If you have new tires up front, they will easily disperse water while the half-worn rears will go surfing: The water will literally lift the worn rear.

    New tires go on front or back

    New tires go on front or back

    The subject who is truly loyal to the Chief Magistrate will neither advise nor submit to arbitrary measures. Remember, engines and drivetrains get wet when vehicles are driven in the rain. The obvious one is that many drivers are not used to controlling the car when the rear end comes around. Read most recent letters to the editor. Ever seen a used car on a dealer lot with a dirty engine?

    New tires go on front or back

    New tires go on front or back

    New tires go on front or back

    New tires go on front or back

    New tires go on front or back

    Tires on Better Tires, Front or Rear? :: Souza's Tire Service

    For many years, tire installers have wanted to put the better tires on the front, no matter what the vehicle. So, if you went to buy two tires instead of four, or even just to have the tires rotated, the new or better tires would normally be put on the front. However, we're pretty sure that all tire manufacturers are now recommending having the better tires on the rear.

    Not only will some retailers refuse to put new tires on the front when buying only two, we've even heard that putting new tires only in the front is illegal in some states though we were unable to verify the latter. Continental tire was kind enough to send the boss along with many others to their proving grounds in Uvalde, Texas, and they did a demonstration of this. It involved each participant driving around a circle at 50 mph. Each person drove two matching cars: When they hit the water in the car with the better tires on the back, the front tires lost grip, the car wouldn't continue to turn and the car skidded straight ahead.

    New tires go on front or back

    On the other hand, when the participants hit the water in the car with the better tires on the front, the rear tires lost grip first, the rear end of the car started to come around, and some people even spun! This type of situation can certainly happen in mountain driving, but the same thing can happen if you have to slam on the brakes or swerve.

    Therefore, there are two reasons why you would want the better tires on the rear. The obvious one is that many drivers are not used to controlling the car when the rear end comes around. The other is that the majority of the safety equipment in most cars is designed for front impacts, and usually very little protects you from side or rear impacts.

    New tires go on front or back

    Therefore, for maximum safety, the better tires should be kept on the rear. You may argue that you drive slowly, and therefore never get into this type of situation. What if someone pulls out in front of you? Anyway, think about it. The problem with this is that since most cars wear their front tires faster, you will never be able to rotate them properly, will never get the best wear out of you tires, and if you have a mileage warranty, it will be voided because you haven't rotated your tires.

    As a side note, the requirements for mileage warranties are not too easy to meet, so trying to do so may not even be worthwhile, see our "Mileage Warranties" page. The old school of thought, which we subscribed to before Continental's demostration was that as your tires wear, the front tires normally wear faster.

    Also, front tires tend to wear more on the edges, and rear tires more in the middle. Since these things are true, not only would wear be distibuted more evenly on all four tires, but all four tires would wear more evenly across the tread face, and therefore wear longer.

    New tires go on front or back

    This is why all manufacturers require regular rotations for any mileage warranty. So, if in the interest of safety, you decide to keep the better tires on the back, you will probaly only rotate them if you're buying two tires.

    Since most vehicles wear their front tires faster, within a few thousand miles, the front tires will be more worn than the backs so you won't want to rotate them then. Then, since the front tires can wear out much faster than the rears, you will want to probably want to replace only the fronts, and then move the rear tires to the front.

    Is It Better To Put New Tires on the Front or Back? -EricTheCarGuy



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